Search

NYIP offers three distance education multi-media courses for photographers looking to improve their skills while working from home at their own pace.

Tag Cloud
Get Social With Us
test

 

Monday
Apr152013

Five Favorite Springtime Photos

With Spring finally upon us, I have picked out my five favorite images from the season so far. Some of these images are indicative of the transformation of the seasons, showcasing the first signs of this year's gradual shift from Winter to Spring. Enjoy!

A buttercup (Eranthis hyemalis) blossoms through the spring snow in the "Gardens of the World" in Berlin, on March 27, 2013. (Soeren Stache/AFP/Getty Images)A woman gestures during a sun salutation, on the beach in Nice, southeastern France, on March 19, 2013. (AP Photo/Lionel Cironneau) A woman and child pose for another photographer, under the cherry blossoms around the Tidal Basin that are starting to bloom, Friday, April 5, 2013 in Washington, D.C. The blossoms are blooming a little later than expected due to the unseasonably cool weather. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)Stella Ferruzola, 3, poses with a Blue Morpho butterfly on her nose at the Sensational Butterflies Exhibition at the Natural History Museum in London, on March 25, 2013. (Reuters/Luke MacGregor)A swan swims in the early spring sun at the inner city harbor in Berlin, on March 5, 2013. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)

What do you think of my choices? Give us your feedback and let us know!


We're the New York Institute of Photographya distance education school teaching photography since 1910 - over 100 years of knowledge and experience. Listen to the following podcast to learn more about who we are and what we do.

AUDIO LINK: WHAT IS THE NEW YORK INSTITUTE OF PHOTOGRAPHY? [20:58M]

 

 

Friday
Apr122013

NYIP Launches New Online Photo Project Submission Portal for Students 

On March 25th, as a part of our mission to provide the highest-quality photography education to students all over the world, here at the New York Institute of Photography we announced the launch of a new online photo project submission portal for students enrolled in their photography courses. This update to the courses was based on a request from new and existing students, and greatly improves the speed with which students can get feedback from their teachers as they move through the course.

For years, NYIP students would mail their photo projects into the school to be evaluated by their photography teacher. The reasons for this process were to ensure students could create a print, and to provide teachers with prints so that they could evaluate photos without worrying about their computer monitors affecting the coloring or photo quality. Over the last six months, NYIP worked to build a state of the art photo upload system that allows students to share high quality photos through the web, and get feedback from their teachers on the same platform.

"The new online submission portal is the best thing to happen to NYIP’s courses in a long time," said NYIP's head student advisor Chris Corradino. "It will help students complete their projects faster, save them money on shipping, and improve the quality of the photography training that our students receive."

The online photo project submissions will completely replace the physical mail process currently in the course for all new students in both the Complete Course in Professional Photography and the Fundamentals of Digital Photography moving forward. For those students who will still require physical submissions for any reason, they will be given that option.

For more information on this new process, please contact the school at 1-800-445-7279 or info@nyip.com.

To see the original press release, click here.

 

 


We're the New York Institute of Photographya distance education school teaching photography since 1910 - over 100 years of knowledge and experience. Listen to the following podcast to learn more about who we are and what we do.

AUDIO LINK: WHAT IS THE NEW YORK INSTITUTE OF PHOTOGRAPHY? [20:58M]

 

 

Wednesday
Apr102013

Fashion World Video: Are There Too Many Photographers? 

Tommy Ton, fashion blogger/photographerI was intriduged by today's Video Pick (an excellent piece by Garage Magazine) from the perspective of historial fashion journalism. The rise of bloggers and street photographers has increased the visibility and proliferation of fashion images, and I suspect it's the same in every lifestyle segment.

Aside from my work at the New York Institute of Photography, I run an interior design blog, and there are a zillion blogs in my space now (I was an early pioneer back in 2007), and each design event is photographed by dozens of shooters, from pros with DSLRs to smartphone snappers. Sports, fashion, design, celebrities, politics, general news - literally every segment of society is now photographed like - as our video today points out - a parody of reality shows.

We have this sudden urge to document everything and everyone, and then spread the word. Digital photography, the blogosphere, social networks, and smartphones make citizen journalism possible - with its positive and negative connotations. It makes you want to be a much more careful consumer of blogs, magazines, and websites, doesn't it? Let's start to sift through all the images and discern which ones show great photographic technique.

 

 

Who Are We?

Click here to watch the New York Institute of Photography video.


Monday
Apr082013

This was England: the photographs of Chris Killip

Written by Lucy Davies, Content shared via The Telegraph 

Chris Killip's study of the communities that bore the brunt of industrail decline in the North East (of England) have earned him a nomination for the Deutsche Börse Photography Prize 

Boo and his rabbit, Lynemouth, 1983 Photo: Chris Killip

Chris Killip, 66, was a cycling enthusiast earning a living as the manager of the Isle of Man’s only four-star hotel when he came across the photograph that would alter the course of his life. Taken by Henri Cartier-Bresson in 1954, it depicted a small boy carrying two bottles of wine, and it caught Killip’s eye while he was hunting for photographs of the Tour de France in a battered copy of Paris Match. ‘I was mesmerised by the photograph, and slightly tortured, too,’ he recalls. ‘I knew it wasn’t a snapshot, but I wasn’t sure what it was and that puzzled me greatly.’ Two years later, in 1964, Killip, who had left school with no qualifications, had a new vocation as a photographer, and had earned enough money to send himself to London to attempt to learn from the best. He made a list of the 50 best photographers working in Britain. Top came the triumvirate known as ‘the terrible trio’ – David Bailey, Terence Donovan and Brian Duffy – but Killip’s nerve failed him and instead he knocked at the door of number four, the advertising photographer Adrian Flowers.

Killip became his assistant and, in between throwing parties for the conductor Daniel Barenboim and the cellist Jacqueline Du Pré, learnt his craft diligently. By the mid-1970s he was ensconced in Newcastle upon Tyne on a two-year photo­graphy fellowship, sponsored by Northern Gas, which gave him the freedom to photograph to his heart’s content.

The project for which Killip has been nominated for this year’s Deutsche Börse Photography Prize is a retrospective of the work he began making at around this time. It traces the two decades he spent living in the struggling industrial communities of the North East, immersing himself in the region’s landscape and culture. ‘You didn’t have to be a genius to realise how important it was to get in and photograph it before it all fell apart,’ he says. ‘The strange thing is, I didn’t realise how quickly it would go.’


Housing and Swan Hunters Shipyard, Wallsend, 1975

For Killip ‘photography was a good way to try to get inside things, to get intimate.’ Infiltrating was ‘always hard, but it depended how much you wanted to do it.’ His work often put him in danger – he was hit around the head with an iron bar at an illegal horse race – but most of the time the locals wanted him to succeed. ‘At the Pirelli tyre factory, one of the workers said, “If your pictures could convey what it’s really like to work here, that would be something.” And I knew exactly what he meant. I was always trying to make photography with that responsibility. I wanted it to be more than a document, to be something that is as close as you could possibly be to the subject.’

 

To via the article in its original form, click here

 

 


We're the New York Institute of Photographya distance education school teaching photography since 1910 - over 100 years of knowledge and experience. Listen to the following podcast to learn more about who we are and what we do.

AUDIO LINK: WHAT IS THE NEW YORK INSTITUTE OF PHOTOGRAPHY? [20:58M]

 

 

Friday
Apr052013

Who are we?

Here at the New York Institute of Photography, we pride ourselves on the reputation we have established through the comprehensive learning experience we have provided our students over the years.

Want to learn more about what makes NYIP so great? Don't take our word for it! Check out our new About Us Video in which students and staff discuss what makes the New York Institute of Photography the best home-study photography school in the world. 

Go to our website at nyip.com to find out more and enroll in one of our stellar photography courses today. Your own NYIP experience is just a few clicks away.  

 


We're the New York Institute of Photographya distance education school teaching photography since 1910 - over 100 years of knowledge and experience. Listen to the following podcast to learn more about who we are and what we do.

AUDIO LINK: WHAT IS THE NEW YORK INSTITUTE OF PHOTOGRAPHY? [20:58M]

 

Page 1 ... 3 4 5 6 7 ... 74 Next 5 Entries »