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NYIP offers three distance education multi-media courses for photographers looking to improve their skills while working from home at their own pace.

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Wednesday
Apr032013

Photographer at Work: Commercial Photo Shoot of T-Shirts

We ask our students to imagine themselves in real-life work situations, putting their photography skills to the test. But each and every situation is going to be different. It's obvious that shooting a series of landscapes will be radically different than a pet portrait session with a frisky doberman. In today's featured video, we've got a behind-the-scenes look at commercial photographer Eric Forberger, a Lancaster, PA pro who does a great job putting an entire T-shirt clad group of models at ease. Note his advice on how to change up the poses after the strobes fire. And, of course, his advice to have fun. Go to FakeLife to read about this wonderful charitable organization, and click on "Shop FakeLife" to see Eric's T-shirt and model photos.
 

 

We're the New York Institute of Photographya distance education school teaching photography since 1910 - over 100 years of knowledge and experience. Listen to the following podcast to learn more about who we are and what we do.

AUDIO LINK: WHAT IS THE NEW YORK INSTITUTE OF PHOTOGRAPHY? [20:58M]

 


Monday
Apr012013

Instagram and Social Media Food Photography Featured on Top Food Blog

Instagram image: avocado sword on top of mujadarah from @sproutedkitchen

With countless photos generated every day, we're deluged with images. I'm appreciative of anyone providing a way to filter and curate this amazing, never-stopping flood of photos and help deliver some sense to we who love good images. Let's take food photography, for instance. There are so many great food blogs and websites that feature excellent snaps of dishes that continually make my mouth water, but how delighted I was to find First We Feast, a more-than-food way to look at lifestyles.
Our goal is to cover not just the feasting, but everything that comes along with it. We see food as an illuminating lens into pop culture, music, travel, and more.
 
Instagram image: @food52 took this photo of the two important March Madness food groups.

Check out First We Feast's Food Porn posts, featuring "The Week's Best Instagram and Social Media Photos," featuring food, of course, but also viewers windows into our culture. This is an excellent curated way to view food photography, out of all the images generated each week. Now if only we could have curated "best of" features for all different types of photography. We'll be on the lookout for such qualitative sites and will showcase them as we find them - and please share where you like to go online for photography inspiration!
 
Instagram image: fantastic colorful spring citrus display from @theforestfeast.

We're the New York Institute of Photographya distance education school teaching photography since 1910 - over 100 years of knowledge and experience. Listen to the following podcast to learn more about who we are and what we do.

AUDIO LINK: WHAT IS THE NEW YORK INSTITUTE OF PHOTOGRAPHY? [20:58M]

 


Saturday
Mar302013

In the Spirit and on the Street

Written by David Gonzalez, Content shared via lens.blogs.nytimes.com 

© Larry Racioppo - Christ carried his cross down fifth Avenue in Brooklyn. 1979.

It was Good Friday a little over 40 years ago when Larry Racioppo’s aunt called and urged him to grab his cameras and race over to her parish, St. John the Evangelist, in South Brooklyn.

“My aunt was active in the Rosary Society there,” he recalled. “She said, ‘There’s something going on you might be interested in.’ It was a procession.”

When he arrived, he found biblical scenes playing out along the street: Centurions standing guard over a sorrowful Mary and a tortured Christ in his agony. On the sidewalk, people watched reverently.

That encounter has led Mr. Racioppo — who retired in 2009 as photographer for New York City’s housing agency — to seek out similar pageants and processions in Brooklyn. Over the years, he has been going to these public celebrations in four churches, accumulating an archive of images that show how faith is lived on the streets of New York.

Unlike some traditional documentary essays about Holy Week in Spain or Guatemala, his images show an intimacy with both the people and the city. It has been a running concern in his street photography, which includes a series on memorial walls and religious spaces in daily neighborhood life.

“He has an intellectual curiosity focusing on how faith manifests itself throughout our city,” said Patricia C. Pongracz, the acting director of the Museum of Biblical Art, which featured some of his photos in “The Word on the Street,” a 2005 exhibit. “Larry shows you the throngs, but he is able to identify people and, through the construction of his photos, really show as much as this is communal and joyous — it is a parade after all — it is coming from a deep personal context. He is not documenting a moment in time. He is showing it as a living tradition.”

During his old day job, Mr. Racioppo often traveled to neighborhoods that were home to growing numbers of Latinos steeped in Catholic tradition or African-Americans for whom faith was a bedrock value, especially during hard times. He could relate to some of it.

“Raised as an Italian Catholic, you have this visual predisposition to this stuff,” he said. “The statues, my grandmother’s altar with candles, the liturgy of the church itself was very visual.”

His first foray into the world of processions started at his aunt’s parish, where more Puerto Ricans were moving in and bringing their Holy Week customs. As he got to know the people he photographed, he learned that this participatory public liturgy was mostly a result of the efforts of a core group of volunteers.

But after five years, as with many volunteer efforts, people moved and the tradition faded. It wasn’t until the 1990s that Mr. Racioppo learned of another such procession in Bushwick, at St. Barbara’s Church. What he discovered when he arrived there was a theater troupe whose ambitions matched the sanctuary’s grandeur. He went behind the scenes, taking pictures of the work of dozens of volunteers who met at night in the run-up to Easter. They would include everyone from seamstresses who made the costumes to a D.J. who used smoke machines and recorded thunder for dramatic effect during crucifixion scenes.

© Larry Racioppo - The children’s choir at the Greater Zion Shiloh Baptist Church

In addition to the public procession on Good Friday, the group mounted tableaux vivants in the adjoining school, replicating biblical scenes with great attention to detail.

“They would have elaborate stagings, and people would freeze on the stage and hold the pose,” he said. “You’d see people reaching for Christ with a look of joy. They’d hold the pose for a minute or two, then the curtain would close. There’d be a 15-minute break, you’d see the curtain move, scraping on the floor and then there’d be another scene. No moving or talking, but a three-dimensional live sculpture.”

On the street, however, there was plenty of talking during the Good Friday procession. At a time when drugs and violence were claiming lives in pre-gentrified Bushwick, the procession was used as a way to illustrate an urban via crucis.

The priest would stop in front of a place where drugs were sold and say: ‘Here Jesus falls for the third time. This is where our people are crucified today,’ ” Mr. Racipppo said. “He anchored the liturgy in something specifically in the community.”
 

The Rev. John Powis, who was pastor during that era, remembers how those prayers made some people nervous.

“The cops were afraid of it because they thought it was going to create a problem on the scene,” said Father Powis, who retired from St. Barbara’s in 2004. “But many of our people thought it was a good idea. The drugs were just going wild back then.”

Mr. Racioppo himself was alarmed in more recent years by something he witnessed at Greater Zion Shiloh Baptist Church on Fulton Street, where the deacon played the role of Christ.

“There was a lot of singing and dancing, more emotional like Pentecostals,” Mr. Racioppo said. “At one point, the deacon started shaking. I thought he was having a seizure and took out my phone to call 911. He was shaking and writhing on the floor. Then people made a circle around him and started dancing. He wasn’t in danger. He was in the spirit.”

 

To view this article in its original form, click here

 


We're the New York Institute of Photographya distance education school teaching photography since 1910 - over 100 years of knowledge and experience. Listen to the following podcast to learn more about who we are and what we do.

AUDIO LINK: WHAT IS THE NEW YORK INSTITUTE OF PHOTOGRAPHY? [20:58M]

 

Friday
Mar292013

Want to show people online your NYIP cred? Become a badge owner today!

Looking for a way to add some flair to your website while proudly proclaiming your affiliation to the storied NYIP family? Look no further than the New York Institute of Photography badge! To get your own, simply go to the to the NYIP site badge page and copy-and-paste the embed code into your HTML where you would like NYIP badge to appear. NYIP Badges come in three sizes: 125px X 125px, 150px X 150px, and 200px X 200px, but can be customized to fit your specific needs by manually changing the dimensions. Get your free badge and become a proud member today!  


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For more information about the badges and the school itself, check out our website at nyip.com


We're the New York Institute of Photographya distance education school teaching photography since 1910 - over 100 years of knowledge and experience. Listen to the following podcast to learn more about who we are and what we do.

AUDIO LINK: WHAT IS THE NEW YORK INSTITUTE OF PHOTOGRAPHY? [20:58M]

 

 

Wednesday
Mar272013

Bambi Cantrell: How to capture !EMOTION! in your photographs

Content shared via: silberstudios.tv 

Bambi Cantrell is one of the world’s most decorated and sought after professional photographers of our time. She’s been recognized by everyone from Microsoft to American Photo Magazine and was the first woman to be honored with the prestigious “Golden Eye” award from the Russian Federation of Professional Photographers. Clearly she’s got the technical side of her game in order.

But we feel one of the main reasons why she’s shot for The Estee Lauder Family, legendary basketball player Gary Payton, and members of the Royal Family, Dubai, UAE is her ability to really make her subjects comfortable. The ability to connect plays a huge role in getting truly personal shots that make her portraits really resonate.

To view the article in its original form, click here

 

Here at NYIP, we are always looking to share photo tips from successful photographers with our students.  


We're the New York Institute of Photographya distance education school teaching photography since 1910 - over 100 years of knowledge and experience. Listen to the following podcast to learn more about who we are and what we do.

AUDIO LINK: WHAT IS THE NEW YORK INSTITUTE OF PHOTOGRAPHY? [20:58M]

 

 

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