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Entries in Chicago (3)

Wednesday
May082013

The Rhythm of the Rails: Jack Delano’s iconic 1940s images of trains, railyards and workers

Written by , Shared via Imaging Resource

If you've taken any of our online photography courses or have learned photoshop, you know all about turning black and white photos into color.

Jack Delano's gorgeous color images from the 1940s remind us of the day when railroads dominated the American landscape -- and the American consciousness. The gigantic locomotives, the play of light on steel rails and the huge roundhouses were all elements that spurred the imagination and presented a subject of infinite possibilities for a photographer. The railroads had bound the country together and opened the West. Chicago was the hub, especially the Chicago and Northwestern Railway Company's Proviso yard.

Working for the U.S. Farm Security Administration, he traveled across America photographing the effects of the Depression on American life. At the time, the railroads meant freedom and they seduced thousands of unemployed men -- and some women -- to ride the rails. They hitched rides on freight trains and hid in empty cars or slept on top of them, always on the alert for the railroad cops. In the depths of the Depression, their primary goal was to get "somewhere else" and find a job.

Mike Evans, a welder, at the rip tracks at Proviso yard of the Chicago and Northwest Railway Company. Chicago, Illinois, April 1943. Reproduction from color slide. Photo by Jack Delano. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress
Delano was originally one of those job seekers himself when he proposed a photographic project to document the mining operations and working conditions of the Schuylkill County,Pennsylvania-area, coal mines. He sent samples of his photographs and applied for a job at the FSA's Photography program, which was headed by the charismatic Roy Stryker and was part of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's 1933 New Deal -- a program aimed at creating jobs for some of America's millions of unemployed.
A welder who works in the round-house at the Chicago and Northwestern Railway Company's Proviso yard. Chicago, Illinois, December 1942. Reproduction from color slide. Photo by Jack Delano. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress
 At the recommendation of the photographer Marion Post Wolcott, Stryker hired the young Delano on the condition that he had his own car and a driver's license. At a salary of $2,300 a year, Delano -- along with Wolcott, Russell Lee, Walker Evans, Gordon Parks, Dorothea Lange and others -- helped produce what is probably the greatest photographic record of American life ever made.
Women workers employed as wipers in the roundhouse having lunch in their rest room, Chicago and Northwest Railway Company. Clinton, Iowa, April 1943. Reproduction from color slide. Photo by Jack Delano. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress
Surprisingly a large number of these images were shot in color with the newly available Kodachrome transparency film. Delano was one of the FSA photographers who shot a good deal of his work in color, both as Kodachrome 35mm slides and medium format transparencies. In 2006, the Library of Congress produced an exhibition, Bound For Glory, which for the first time featured a collection of these color photographs taken by the FSA photographers.
Mrs. Viola Sievers, one of the wipers at the roundhouse giving a giant "H" class locomotive a bath of live steam. Clinton, Iowa, April 1943. Reproduction from color slide. Photo by Jack Delano. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress 
The benefits of classical training

Born Jacob Ovcharov in 1914 in the small Russian village of Voroshilovka, Delano came to America in 1923 with his parents and younger brother. By the age of 9 his creative talents were already evident, and he attended the Settlement Music School in Philadelphia where he studied graphic arts, photography and the viola. After that he continued his studies of illustration and music at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts until 1932.

Switchman throwing a switch at Chicago and Northwest Railway Company's Proviso yard. Chicago, Illinois, April 1943. Reproduction from color slide. Photo by Jack Delano. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress
In these Chicago Northwestern Railroad photographs, I think you can feel Delano's musical training. Like his contemporary -- the similarly classically trained Ansel Adams -- there is the same sense of power and grandeur. They share the romanticism of the New World, where Nature and Technology have replaced the old gods. In Delano's photographs the trains and the railyards dwarf people, in much the same way as the landscape does in Adams' photographs.
View in a departure yard at Chicago and Northwestern Railway Company's Proviso yard at twilight. Chicago, Illinois, December 1942. Reproduction from color slide. Photo by Jack Delano. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress
More than just a photographer

In 1941, Stryker sent Delano to photograph rural poverty in Puerto Rico. He fell in love with the island and, in 1946, he and his wife Irene settled there permanently. Delano began to write music, and for the next 50 years produced full orchestral, chamber and instrumental works, choral pieces and more. (You can see and hear one of his compositions played by the Orquesta Sinfonica del Conservatorio de Puerto Rico below.)

In Puerto Rico, Delano began to make movies of island life and, in 1953, directed and wrote the score for a film called Los Peloteros about poor rural kids and their love for baseball. The film became a classic in Puerto Rican cinema.

Like so many photographers of his time, Delano was a multi-faceted talent. And although he died in 1997, he left us the legacy of his superb photographs and his music compositions.

Chicago Union Station, 1943. Photo by Jack Delano.
To view the article in its original form, click here.
 

WHO ARE WE?

We're the New York Institute of Photographya distance education school teaching photography since 1910 - over 100 years of knowledge and experience.

 Click here to watch the New York Institute of Photography video.

 

Wednesday
Aug292012

Video Pick - Chicago Street Photographer Interview

Photo by Jason Martini Photography

Jason Martini takes client portraits - the kind of formal portraiture and candids many photographers take (visit his website for examples). But we found this video interview with Jason, and it's a great video portfolio of his street photography, his philosophy, and reactions of others to having their pictures taken unawares in public places. Photojournalism and street photography fall under 1st amendment freedoms, by the way, and are protected for photographers. No permission is needed, nor signed releases required for images taken in public places or public venues published online or offline in the United States (crossing over from artistic to commercial use for your images is another matter). Click here to read more about rights issues for street photographers, but realize that you should always get advice from a legal authority for specific cities, states, provinces, countries, and public venues where you'll be taking pictures (use common sense and street smarts, too).

 

 

We're the New York Institute of Photographya distance education school teaching photography since 1910 - over 100 years of knowledge and experience. Listen to the following podcast to learn more about who we are and what we do.

AUDIO LINK: WHAT IS THE NEW YORK INSTITUTE OF PHOTOGRAPHY? [20:58M]

 


Tuesday
May292012

Field Trip - Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago

 

In today's field trip, we're heading to Chicago, IL to the popular Museum of Contemporary Photography. MOCP houses an extensive permanent collection, and exhibits the work of contempoary fine art photographers and photography students. 


Candy Cigarette by Sally Mann / MOCP Collection

 

High Plains Drifter by Simon Patterson / MOCP Collection

 

MOCP is the sole photography-only museum in the Midwestern U.S., and its mission as part of the Chicago College Chicago, an all-arts school, is clearcut.

The Museum strives to communicate the value and significance of photographic images as expressions of human thought, imagination, and creativity.

 

Blizzard by Anthony Goicolea / MOCP Collection 

Untitled from "Women are Beautiful" Portfolio by Garry Winogrand / MOCP Collection

 

 

Agnes in a Fur Collar by Anne Noggle / MOCP Collection

 

Sunny in the Sauna by Nan Goldin / MOCP Collection 

LOCATION

Museum of Contemporary Photography 
at Columbia College Chicago
600 S. Michigan
Chicago, IL 60605
312.369.7104

 

HOURS

The Museum is free and open to the public
Monday through Saturday, 10am - 5pm
Thursday, 10am - 8pm
Sunday, 12pm - 5pm

 


We're the New York Institute of Photographya distance education school teaching photography since 1910 - over 100 years of knowledge and experience. Listen to the following podcast to learn more about who we are and what we do.

AUDIO LINK: WHAT IS THE NEW YORK INSTITUTE OF PHOTOGRAPHY? [20:58M]