Search

NYIP offers three distance education multi-media courses for photographers looking to improve their skills while working from home at their own pace.

Tag Cloud
Get Social With Us
test

 

Entries in Nature Photography (15)

Monday
Mar262012

Top 10 Photos: Vote for Your Favorite Showers Photo


In our third Top 10 Photos post, I wanted to do an image search on the word "showers." With springtime and April upon us, photographers are inspired by images of rainwater and other types of showers. I wanted to find the 10 best - in my opinion - photographs that incorporated some aspect of showers in the image. I've not put these 10 in any particular order - that task is up to you. Use the survey at the end of the post to vote for your favorite "Showers" image. Thanks for voting and check back soon for another Top 10 Photos vote!

Photo 1: Meteor Showers and Star Trails Over the Blackrock Desert by Waheed Akhtar

Photo 2: The Scent of Pine by DovieMoon

Photo 3: Baby Shower by Lisa Storms

Photo 4: Monsoon's Showers by designldg

Photo 5: Perseid Meteor Shower by Daniel Newton

Photo 6: Comets and Meteor Showers by moonlightphotography

Photo 7: Chance of Showers by Steve Jurvetson

Photo 8: Rain and Rider by Justine Hunt / Boston Globe

Photo 9: Man in Shower by Manjari Sharma

Photo 10: Thai Motorists on Flooded Street by Christophe Archambault / AFP / Getty Images

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We're the New York Institute of Photographya distance education school teaching photography since 1910 - over 100 years of knowledge and experience. Listen to the following podcast to learn more about who we are and what we do.

Audio Link: WHAT IS THE NEW YORK INSTITUTE OF PHOTOGRAPHY? [20:58M]

 

Tuesday
Mar202012

Creative Flower Photography

In honor of the first day of spring, I wanted to share a fun method for creating unique flower images.  

 

The above photo was created with one exposure in camera.  This was not manipulated with software.  Details below:

The trick is to use a slow shutter speed, and an external flash unit like the 580EXII.  I autofocused on the first group of flowers on the left, and started the exposure.  The flash fired, and I waited almost 1 second before quickly pointing the camera to the yellow group of flowers.  The result is similar to that of a double exposure.  The diagram below explains the process further.

 

 

Camera settings:  1.6 second shutter speed, ISO 100, and f32, tripod.  Flash on ETTL at -1, Tripod.

 

 Give it a try, and share the results on our Facebook page.  Enjoy!

Thursday
Mar152012

Photography Comes to the Planet's Rescue - "Chasing Ice" Documentary

 

Photo: Chasing Ice photographer James Balog

Chasing Ice has become an extremely important documentary project, combining the art of photography with the science of global warming to document and report on the too-fast changes to the planet's glacial landscapes.

Photo: Ice Canyon, Greenland by James Balog for National Geographic

Time-lapse photography has captured receding glacial terrain, shrinking ice caps, and other troubling effects from extreme climate change.

Photo: Chasing Ice

James Balog, a National Geographic photographer, the prime catalyst on this documentary project as he creates The Extreme Ice Project and sets about with a team of associates to provide irrefutable photographic evidence of Arctic ice loss due to climate change. Here's our Video Pick of the week, an excerpt from this important documentary.

 

 

 

We're the New York Institute of Photographya distance education school teaching photography since 1910 - over 100 years of knowledge and experience. Listen to the following podcast to learn more about who we are and what we do.

Audio Link: WHAT IS THE NEW YORK INSTITUTE OF PHOTOGRAPHY? [20:58M]


Monday
Jan302012

How I Plan a Landscape Photo Shoot

In this post, I'd like to talk about photo shoot preparation using the Photo Ephemeris. This is a tool that I've only started using in the last two years but have quickly come to rely on. Before that, it was much more difficult to predict the exact location of the sun and moon, especially when planning a shoot months in advance.

 

As you can see in the photos below from Robert Moses State Park, it is possible to pinpoint the location of the sun and moon with incredible precision. The darker orange line indicates where the sun is setting. This is a screen capture from the iPad app.  For $9, it's a very valuable tool.  There is already a version for the iPhone, with an Android app on the way.

 

As expected, the sun was setting between the Lighthouse and neighboring building, and I was able to use a very small aperture to create the long sunbeams.  

 

Fire Island Lighthouse, Long Island, NY

 

It was this tool that also allowed me to plan my Super moon shot over the Atlantic Ocean.  The light blue line shows where the moon will rise.  This is a screen capture from the free desktop version available for PC and Mac computers. 

Super Moon 2011, Robert Moses State Park, NY

 

The Ephemeris has some other great features for those who like to get very technical.  Here's a video to show a few more of its capabilities.  

 

 

 

We're the New York Institute of Photographya distance education school teaching photography since 1910 - over 100 years of knowledge and experience. Listen to the following podcast to learn more about who we are and what we do.

Audio Link: WHAT IS THE NEW YORK INSTITUTE OF PHOTOGRAPHY? [20:58M]

Monday
Jan092012

Getting Close to Birds in the Wild

Getting close to a bird in the wild is not an easy task.  Long lenses and tele-extenders are helpful, but typically fall short of providing frame filling close-ups.   Here are some basic techniques I use to get in position for most wildlife encounters, especially birds. 


 

 

First, avoid wearing bright clothing, especially red, orange and yellow.  These will tend to scare off most creatures even from a distance.  Try to blend in with neutral earth tones and camouflage.  Sometimes walking on your knees will be necessary, so leave your designer jeans at home.  By remaining low, you are forced to slow down, and your chances of getting a great shot improve dramatically. 

 

 

As soon as you arrive at your location take the camera out of the bag, and mount it on your tripod.  By having the camera ready to go, you will eliminate disruptive sounds like the zipper on a bag opening.  Plus, you’ll be able to shoot in an instant should the opportunity arise.

 

 

When you spot your subject, do not walk directly towards it on a straight line.  This will be seen as an aggressive move, and the bird will take off immediately.  Instead, approach slowly on more of an indirect angle.  Avoid making direct eye contact as it can be viewed as confrontational.  Instead, use your peripheral vision while pretending to scan the ground for food.  If the bird is startled, stand motionless until it returns to its natural behavior.  Proceed with caution, and inch forward quietly.

 

 

The next time you’re in the field, give this a try and let me know how it goes.  You just may find yourself with a great catch!

 

Page 1 2 3