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Entries in Tech (11)

Friday
Oct192012

New Nikon Coolpix breaks ground with Google's Android OS

Nikon recently announced the Wi-Fi-enabled 16-megapixel Coolpix S800c basic camera—the first camera on the market that runs Google's Android operating system (version 2.3). 

Nikon has made a momentous technological stride by implementing the Android 2.3 Gingerbread operating system in their newest version of the Coolpix camera. The S800c comes equipped with standard features you'd find in a viable point-and-shoota 1/2.3-inch 16-megapixel backside-illuminated CMOS sensor, a Nikon Expeed C2 processing engine, and a 10x f3.2-5.8 25-250mm lens with optical image stabilization—but with the addition of Android's OS, downloadable apps, Wi-fi, and a 3.5-inch, 819K-dot OLED touch screen. BOOM. Photojournalists, you're welcome. 

 

Photo Credit: Nikon

To learn more, go to the Consumer Reports article: Nikon Coolpix S800c : The world's smartest camera?

 


We're the New York Institute of Photographya distance education school teaching photography since 1910 - over 100 years of knowledge and experience. Listen to the following podcast to learn more about who we are and what we do.

AUDIO LINK: WHAT IS THE NEW YORK INSTITUTE OF PHOTOGRAPHY? [20:58M]

 

 

Monday
Jul302012

Foliobook 3.0 the Comprehensive Portfolio iPad App?


Foliobook, an iPad photography portfolio application, recently launched its updated software for iPad 3 and iOS 5.1. The Foliobook 3.0 introduces a number of features that were not available in previous versions, such as a gallery music player, Dropbox image loading, a side navigation bar, and new retina display resolution, which fits the iPad 3 2048 x 1536 retina screen perfectly (those with iPads 1 and 2 should consult Foliobook's image sizing guidance). The Foliobook app allows users to customize almost all aspects of their portfolio, from gallery display to home page design, and supports a simple and easy to use management interface. For a more in-depth look at how to customize various elements and navigate the Foliobook interface, watch the video tutorials available on the Foliobook website. Here's one on how to edit your portfolio cover page:  

To learn more about the app, go to their website at www.folio.mobi

Is Foliobook 3.0 the best portfolio app out there? Are there better options? Give us your feedback and let us know what you think! 

 

We're the New York Institute of Photographya distance education school teaching photography since 1910 - over 100 years of knowledge and experience. Listen to the following podcast to learn more about who we are and what we do.

AUDIO LINK: WHAT IS THE NEW YORK INSTITUTE OF PHOTOGRAPHY? [20:58M]

 



Friday
Jul132012

'Spray-on': The Next Big Thing in Battery Design?

 

 

A team of researchers at Rice University have developed the ability to literally paint rechargeable lithium-ion batteries onto surfaces. The five layer, .5 mm battery, which can form around any curve or contour, will cause a major rethink in the way current portable devices are being designed, as they will no longer have to set aside space for a bulky battery to be built in. The 'spray-on' technology has been tested on a variety of surfaces including ceramic tile, glass, and steel. 

 

 

Footage provided by: Ajayan Research Group 

Who knows? Maybe soon you'll be able to cross extra batteries off your Preshoot Checklist entirely. 


We're the New York Institute of Photographya distance education school teaching photography since 1910 - over 100 years of knowledge and experience. Listen to the following podcast to learn more about who we are and what we do.

AUDIO LINK: WHAT IS THE NEW YORK INSTITUTE OF PHOTOGRAPHY? [20:58M]

 

Monday
Nov142011

Three Videos that Inspire 

I've recently discovered three videos that inspire action, and stir the imagination.  Each one has been added here for your viewing pleasure.  Enjoy!

 

Time Lapse of Planet Earth from Outer Space

 

Steve Jobs explains how to succeed in business.

 

Robots powered by webcams!

 

 

Monday
Aug152011

Photographs Are Not Created with Mouse Clicks

Despite all of the amazing advancements we've recently seen in photography, I usually find myself more impressed and inspired by images created by photographers of the past. W. Eugene Smith, Ernst Haas, and Walker Evans to name a few.  They weren't paid by the mouse click, but rather for capturing a real moment in time.  They didn't use HDR or prepackaged "actions" to create a certain look. There was no anti-shake built into the camera body, and flash sync speeds were around 1/60. Yet, to these photographers and the countless others who went before, the limitations of their gear only worked to sharpen their senses. They weren't bogged down or distracted by all this technology and as a result, connected with their subject in a way that's visible in their work.

As we move into an increasingly digital world, I am seeing an increase in blogs and websites with comprehensive lists detailing every last piece of equipment in their bag.  While it's nice to see that Canon and Nikon's marketing efforts are working, the resulting portfolios are rarely as impressive.  The photos may be technically sound but the photographer's personal touch is overshadowed by the technology used to create it. Somewhere behind all the layers of post production, there are images which wouldn't really stand up on their own.

Today with every tool at our disposal, I believe there is a real danger in simply relying on technology instead of mastering our craft.  Take Neil Leifer's photo of Muhammed Ali for example.  It was captured in 1965 and I've yet to see a more powerful boxing image even with today's fastest motor drives.  His timing was impeccable and the exposure did not need to be rescued in Photoshop. Technology should not replace photographic knowledge.

Be honest, if you were to cover up your camera's LCD screen with tape, could you still use manual exposure properly?  If not, then your photographic muscles need flexing. I say this not to discourage, but rather to fire you up for the journey.  As Leonardo Da Vinci said "Those who are in love with practice without knowledge are like the sailor who gets into a ship without rudder or compass and who never can be certain whether he is going."  Now the question is, where do you go from here?